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Why Context Matters for Media Strategies

Strategy Perception - Context

If you’re paying attention to the ad industry at all, you’re probably aware of the ‘attention’ media buyers have received by their clients. The kind of attention that costs thousands or millions to resolve.

Though you should always be assessing media spends and evaluating effectiveness, its come to our attention at IQ that many marketers today neglect a seemingly obvious and important piece of media effectiveness — context.

It’s important to seek 3rd party research for a number of applications in marketing. But think for a minute about your own consumption patterns.

Have I ever purchased directly after clicking a banner ad?


Have I ever purchased a product from preroll video advertising?

or even,

When’s the last time I purchased a new product based on TV ads?

You’ve likely completed a purchase from a form of display advertising (loosely defined). Now think of your answers to these types of questions in the context of your consumption —“What else was I doing during this time?” Your answers will vary here.

Maybe you were checking email, and clicked a link to an article. Maybe you were attempting to watch your favorite show on Hulu. But definitely, you were checking messages on your phone, your Apple Watch, your Fitbit, or corralling the kid(s).

We live in an era of multitasked, multiscreen, low attention span consumption habits. In this case, we must consider the context for which an ad of any sort is seen by the consumer to develop a style of ad that will grab attention when we need it to.

To make the best ads possible, marketers must consider context along with attention and strategy to determine the right approach.

Below is a brief framework for creating more effective ads:

1.  Context

- Where will the consumer be when viewing the ads? 

- What platform will the ads be viewed on? 

- What will the consumer (likely) be doing when viewing the ads? (i.e. multitasking) 

2. Attention

- How attentive will the audience be on this platform? 

- Which screen will their attention be driven to?

- What type of content will surround the ad? 

3. Strategy

- Based on context and attention level, should the ad promote engagement or persuade the consumer? 

- Should the ad inform or entertain primarily?

- How critical is attention on first touch? (considering multi-channel ad campaigns)

The history of advertising leans heavily on persuasion. Shopping used to be fairly linear in that you might see an ad on TV or in a magazine and head directly in-store for more information. Advertisers had to persuade you enough to get you to physically try or buy.

But as the internet expanded in popularity, so did ad channels, creating a new ad content approach: engagement. Consider social media advertising. Attention spans will be remarkably low due to the amount of content. For this platform, its critical to get attention fast through entertaining content. This is why context matters first and foremost.

The next time you’re planning for new ad campaigns, try using this framework to right size your spend by platform and create content that’s appropriate for the context. If anything, you’ll likely have well grounded creative ideas and maybe even happier customers over time.

Want to know more about IQ? Contact Us

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3 Ways Voice and Tone Influence Brand Perception

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3 Ways Voice and Tone Influence Brand Perception

It's all in your voice and tone

“It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it.”

We’ve all heard this adage before. While it may serve a purpose in personal communication, it’s just not true for brands. As a brand what you say is just as important as how you say it. And since most brand communication is written, you’ve got to account for a lack of vocal and facial nuance with what you’re saying, too.

Every brand has a style guide, and just as important as having branded logos and colors is having a brand voice and tone document. This document will help you figure out how to express the brand’s values and thinking in written communication on websites, emails, social posts, and more. Voice and tone are two distinct aspects of verbal and written expression that impact how a brand’s audience perceives them.

A brand’s “voice” is much like a person’s “voice.” It’s how they speak, the words they use and the order of phrases that communicate a feeling or message.

A brand’s tone, just like a person’s, changes subtly depending on the topic. A brand may use more slang or be more energetic on social media, but more straightforward on an email or a landing page.

Let’s look at an example of how the voice stays consistent while the tone shifts with circumstance:

How a brand interacts with their audience on social media on 4th of July is going to look a lot different from how they do on Memorial Day. Why? Because 4th of July is a day of patriotic celebration, and Memorial Day is a day of remembrance for those who have died while serving our country. You wouldn’t want to share a post for Memorial Day with the cheerful exuberance you would expect in a 4th of July post. If you did that, you risk alienating the members of your audience who have ties to the military.

Clearly the tone is just as important as the voice in these kind of posts, and both are equally likely to influence the way an audience views a brand. Here are some things to keep in mind when thinking of how to use your brand’s voice and tone to positively influence your audience:

1. Pinpoint what you want to talk about as a brand.

Understanding what topics you want to talk about as a brand is a great first step. These topics should relate back to the brand’s values. You can incorporate the brand values into your writing on these topics. This is a great way to reinforce who your brand is and what the brand stands for.

2. Understand the words that evoke your brand values to your audience.

You know who your brand is, but are you showing your audience who you are as a brand? To find out what your audience thinks of you, you can use social listening to analyze what words or phrases your audience uses to describe you. Using emotionally evocative language is a simple way to impact how your audience sees you. If your audience sees you as glib when you’re going for lighthearted, take a moment to look at the language you’re using as a brand and find ways to keep it playful but sincere.

3. Treat your audience like a part of your team.

You want your audience to become fans and advocates of your brand. You don’t want your audience to feel like they’re being condescended. Share tips, but don’t write in a way that makes your brand sound superior. This can be the simple difference between saying “You may know _____ but did you know _____?” versus “here is every little thing about ______.”  Encourage your audience to create and share their own content with your social media accounts by writing posts that have a personal touch. If your audience feels like you’re creating a community, they are more likely to feel connected to your brand and be involved with your social accounts.

Ultimately as a brand what you say and how you say it impacts how your audience sees you and relates to you. By creating a clear voice and tone guide for your brand you can understand how your audience sees you. As well, you can have a positive influence on their future interactions with your brand on your website, via email and social networks.

Want to know more about IQ? Contact Us

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Tis the season of #PSL

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Tis the season of #PSL


Tis the season of #PSL.

For most people that means the season of orange packaging and pumpkin spice flavors infiltrating everything from coffee creamer to dog treats. But at IQ we take a different approach to that three letter acronym:

Perceive. Share. Learn.

These three principles are at the core of how we grow our knowledge and understanding of any topic, both personally and professionally. When an IQ-er finds an insightful or interesting article online we share it with colleagues via Slack post or an email, and odds are you do the same. This is a simple and effective way to encourage collaborative learning and growth between coworkers.

So put down your pumpkin spice latte and see what the real #PSL is all about.


Perception is at the center of almost everything we do in advertising and marketing Even before we begin a project, we think about different content that we find interesting and pinpoint why. Then, we consider how different audiences react to content as well as how our clients do. We conduct research to find out more about our clients’ audiences as well as those of their competitors. Even during the creative process, we go through rounds of feedback to see what different roles at our agency think about the work. This is all perception, and it’s one of the most important things we do.


It takes three clicks or less to go from reading an article to sharing it with your network on Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook. We all share an enormous amount of content with people every day via social and messaging apps.

When you share something of interest, like updates to a popular social media platform, you’re not only giving others the opportunity to view it, you’re also opening a platform for discussion. This often leads to a wider perspective and understanding of the topic at hand. In the workplace, this also shows your colleagues what topics you are passionate about, and can position you as the go-to expert on content strategy, social listening or another subject.


You learn something new every day. It’s not always a radical epiphany, but striving to gain more knowledge and understanding of the topics you work with on a daily basis is important. Not only will you be better informed and ahead of the curve on trends, you will also be considered a thought leader in your office – if not on a larger scale. Learning is best when it’s collaborative, so take time to create a dialogue with coworkers on relevant professional topics that makes everyone more knowledgeable.

These three principles feed into each other and create a cycle that propels you forward in professional development, both personally and as a team. At IQ, we #PSL every day. How do you?

Want to know more about IQ? Contact Us

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7 Questions for your 2016 Marketing Plan

Twitter: Now With Ocean-Breeze Long Form!

IQ Spotlight: T.R. Wilhoit, Brand Strategist


7 Questions for your 2016 Marketing Plan

Most marketers are well into planning their 2016 budgets–an arduous process that runs the gauntlet of budget approvals. And even though it’s invariably about the numbers, at some point you know someone will be asking you, “What did you accomplish?”

With that in mind, here are a few questions to ask yourself about your 2016 marketing plan to ensure you have a great story to tell this time next year.

1. Does Your Plan Reflect The Way Your Target Audience Engages With Media?
You would be surprised by how many marketing plans still start with traditional media and then add digital. That doesn’t mirror the importance of digital media to your consumers, which is why it’s time for a digital-first plan. That doesn’t mean you cut out traditional marketing–it just means you start with digital at the center of your plan. Consumers form their buying decisions through digital influences so much that to approach consumers in any other way is foolhardy.

2. Have You Done Your Strategic Homework?
The path to purchase is now so complex that you have to map it as the Consumer Decision Journey. This is a channel-agnostic process, which maps the journey for each of your target audience segments so you can see where the critical interaction points are. When combined with other audience research and competitive analysis, you get an accurate picture of when and where it’s most effective to influence your prospects.

3. Do You Have A Content Plan?
How you communicate with prospects when they are exploring your category is different than when they are evaluating options. So whether it’s the copy in an ad or a video on your Web site, you have to know exactly what to say to each audience segment, at every stage in the journey. The only way to know for sure is by doing the work of a content strategy, which acts as the messaging guide for all of your communications.

4. Does Your Plan Prioritize Owned, Earned, And Paid Media Intelligently?
The good news is many opportunities for exposure exist today that do not require you to buy media. This exposure saves you money, but has more influence on consumers than paid advertising. Therefore, your plan should start with owned and earned media before jumping to paid media. If your agency suggests otherwise, then it’s probably making money by spending yours.

5. Do You Have An Integrated Measurement Plan?
Marketers have correctly come to expect detailed metrics and analytics for everything they do. This not only allows you to optimize as you go, but also to measure your performance against goals and plan ahead. In order to really get the value of all this data, you need to plan with clear goals and KPIs, an integrated view of data from all media (both digital and traditional), and a really good analyst to tell you what it all means.

6. Is Your Digital Infrastructure In Place?
The basic idea of an integrated marketing plan is to tie together your marketing touch points into one unified system across all forms of media. This requires some basic pieces of digital infrastructure, which you can’t do without.

This includes probably the most important piece: a mobile-friendly Web site. According to Nielsen, consumers trust brand Web sites more than any other marketing, so your Web site has to be designed for mobile devices.

But technology is not enough.

The Web site is where you must cultivate that trust and convert general interest into sales. This requires state-of-the-art strategy and user experience design. Remember, it’s up to your site to convert interest into action, so make sure yours is best-in-class. Other areas that are often part of digital marketing infrastructure are your social presence across social touch points, search engine optimization (SEO), and search engine marketing (SEM), email, ratings and reviews, mobile Web sites or apps, and marketing automation.

7. Is Content A Priority?
Perhaps the biggest problem with most plans is a lack of focus on content. The word “content,” of course, is a catch-all that includes everything from banner ads and TV spots to videos and interactive tools. All of your planning, media, and infrastructure are there to deliver content. That’s because content is the part of the equation that influences the consumer.

Brands that commit to creating an ongoing stream of high quality, original, compelling content in all forms win hearts and minds. Brands that don’t, regardless of the rest of their marketing investment, cannot win.

Of course if you’re only now getting around to asking these questions, it’s getting late. But go for it anyway, because it’s never too late to start adapting to the realities of the new consumer.



IQ Spotlight: T.R. Wilhoit, Brand Strategist

IQ Spotlight TR Wilhoit, Brand Strategist

IQ is made up of a bunch of rockstars that make incredible work for our clients everyday. We want to give you a glimpse of what it’s like to work in IQ, so once a month we’re going to interview an IQ-er and let you get to know them better.

For the official record, what is your name and your title at IQ?

My name is T.R. Wilhoit and I’m a Brand Strategist at IQ.

What are a few sites you visit at least once a week?

I check Pulse, which is a news aggregator, CNN, and Twitter pretty regularly. They’re useful and pragmatic.

What does “Creative Intelligence” mean to you?

I think it’s the center point where creative executions meet with strategy. I think it’s more conceptual than strategy that informs creative, but the magic meeting between the two.

Tell me about the moment you knew this was the direction you wanted to pursue professionally.

I didn’t really have that moment. It’s been more like a journey of the next logical step. I didn’t study advertising in school, but I interned at IQ and I liked it. I was kind of the black sheep of my major, Sport Marketing. Most people wanted to work in professional sports, I was more “ I like marketing and social media.” And they were like “what’s social media?” So I did more digital work in internships, which lead me here.

What gets you “in the zone” for work?

It depends on what kind of work I’m doing. If it’s more collaborative conceptual thinking or strategy messaging, then laughing helps. If you’re having a good time with the people you’re brainstorming with then that helps get ideas going. If I’m doing something more on my own I like to put on my headphones and put on whatever playlist I have handy.


Beach or Pool?


Stripes or Polka Dots?


Checkers or Chess?


Cats or Dogs?


Tea or Coffee?


Now you know a little more about T.R. Wilhoit!

Want to know more about IQ? Contact Us

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Twitter: Now With Ocean-Breeze Long Form!

Twitter's Long Form Announcement

According to Recode Twitter is releasing a new product that will allow users and brands to publish content that exceed the current 140 character limit of the native Twitter timeline.

Most of the Internet including yours truly originally took this news to mean the Twitter timeline we love would become a bloated mess. And from a user perspective we expected this feature would drive us away. The current Twitter timeline isn’t built or designed for long form. It would take forever to scroll through someone’s late-night alcohol-fueled post-breakup novella. Let alone a verbose poorly written brand statement about their most recent social media gaff.

But this is not the case according to that article. This will be a new product possibly akin to the recently released Moments. We are betting this new feature, like Moments, will be accessible via Twitter’s mobile apps and desktop.

But long form on Twitter is exciting to think about from a marketing point of view. When your strategic research is founded in proven best practices, long form Twitter could be a marketer’s and brand’s dream come true. We will have a new and exciting way to reach users, fans, and followers that is less limiting; allowing us to craft more engaging stories and inspire deeper consumer actions.

You might be asking, “But why is Twitter doing this?”

The 1985 Global System for Mobile Communication set the character limits on text messages at 160 characters. When Twitter launched in 2006, they set the limit at 140 leaving 20 characters for the username. This allowed the tweet to be delivered in one complete text message rather than multiple messages.

But the mobile technology we use every day has evolved far past those early days and Twitter needs to grow to help people (and advertisers) tell their story and share more information. For example, Twitter made a play on native texting earlier this year when they removed the character limitations in Direct Messages.

At the end of the day Twitter is a publically traded company with shareholders to please. Twitter has a highly vested interest in making its platforms and products are more engaging to stimulate its lagging growth and increase use to turn a profit for their investors.

So here is the 140 million dollar question. Will long form Twitter increase engagement and the user base? Probably. At least when the feature is first launched. But we have to also remember that other social platforms like Facebook and LinkedIn have had the long form corner of the social web locked up for a long time.

Need help with your social strategy? Let us know how IQ can help you!

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5 Things We Learned As An Agency at Camp Mac

Robots Just Stole Half Your Media Buy

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5 Things We Learned as an Agency at Camp Mac

In order to get to know one of our newest clients better, many IQ-ers took a trip to Camp Mac to relive the summer camp days of our youths.  We toured the beautiful campgrounds, learned about the camp’s history and even met two of the founders.  But it wasn’t all work – of course we took some time to live like real campers.  We spent an afternoon riding horses, rock wall climbing, zip lining, and taking numerous trips down a giant water slide. In addition to building our relationship and knowledge with our clients, we also learned several valuable lessons that apply to our daily lives at the agency.

1. Keep your eye on the prize:

Whether it’s a day spent scaling a 40-foot rock wall or working on a new project for one of our clients, our agency knows how important it is to stay focused.  We constantly strive hard to meet our goals, and we know that means practicing plenty of concentration, diligence and determination.

Camp Mac rock wall

2. If it were easy it wouldn’t be as rewarding (or as fun!):

There’s nothing more satisfying than accomplishing something you weren’t sure you could do.  We love a good challenge and pushing ourselves to the limits, and sometimes even outside of our comfort zones.  It will almost always yield a positive result.  And hey, we can even have a little fun along the way.

Camp Mac zip line

3. Leadership is at the core of a successful advertising agency:

Spending the day at Camp Mac allowed each of us to fine-tune our leadership skills, while also discovering the value in being a team player.  We learned that leadership is not defined by a specific role or title, but an action that each of us can take every single day.

Camp Mac horseback riding

4. If you fall off the horse get right back up (figuratively AND literally):

Our agency knows that we won’t always get it perfect on the first try.  Luckily we’re a group of people who don’t give up easily! We’ll always work hard to make our better our best.  We’ve also learned that the journey itself can sometimes be just as rewarding as the end result.

Camp Mac horse

5. We’ll only sink if we stop swimming:

At camp we were reminded to always push ourselves, take risks and try new things.  We’ll be there to support each other, and our clients, every step of the way.  If we continue to grow, both as people and as an agency, it will always be time well spent.

Camp Mac swimming

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Robots Just Stole Half Your Media Buy

IQ CEO Tony Quin interviewed in Cannes


Robots just Stole Half your Media Buy


In the past 5 years, if you’ve been part of a media planning discussion, you’ve probably heard the term “programmatic buying.” Prior to programmatic media buying, an advertiser would need to research and identify specific sites that were a fit for a brand and then negotiate the rate, placement, etc. This not only took time, but it limited the reach of your audience taking some of the potential power away from digital. Programmatic buying on the other hand, offers a wide reach across thousands of sites enabled by technology that allows you to target a specific user profile in real-time.

For example, a typical programmatic transaction would involve a user clicking on a website where their IP location and browsing history would then be packaged up and provided to an auction site, at that point the technology mentioned earlier would comb through their profile and determine whether to place an ad next to the article they’re about to read based on the stats (traffic, demographics, content) of that particular site. Using this approach, a brand could theoretically ensure that its ads were being placed in the right place, at the right time, and in front of the right person.


However, with so many sites now available in real-time, it’s impossible to actually know where your ads are running – especially before you’ve already run them. There’s obvious danger around putting blind faith in an automated system, and that danger was recently realized in the form of a research report by the Association of National Advertisers titled, “The Bot Baseline: Fraud in Digital Advertising.”

In the study, the ANA claims that they had expected to find bot-focused websiteswith nothing but a bot audience, but out of nearly three million websites covered in the study, only a few thousand were completely built for bots. Most of the bots visited real websites run by real companies with real human visitors. Those bots inflated the monetized audiences at those sites by 5 to 50 percent.


Anyone who has placed a buy using programmatic advertising knows that following along with the placements and results is complex and specifics are hard to nail down. In fact, some brands that participated in the report said that when they had asked for itemized bills from the various agencies and data companies hired, they all refused. In fact, it may be that this frustration has helped fuel the unprecedented number of media agency reviews in the past year.

Shockingly, what the ANA research proved is that digital ad viewers are increasingly not human. When reviewing data for a video that Chrysler ran last year they found that only 2% of the views were from actual people. A more egregious example is one that was detailed in a Business Week article that highlighted how two placeholder videos shown within a Myspace custom ad unit have become some of the most watched videos in internet history. One of which, you have absolutely never seen, yet it has 1.5 billion views making it bigger than any video currently on YouTube.


The problem is that traffic numbers and impressions sell ad space and ad dollars are the goal, so with many competing sites to run your ads in and the prominence of programmatic, low-involvement auctions, fake traffic has become a commodity. It’s so blatant that there are actually active posts on LinkedIn where you can buy traffic. And publishers are not likely to inform their advertisers when they’re buying traffic for obvious reasons.

Hopefully, this information will shine enough light on these practices that they change. However, to be sure that you’re actually getting what you pay for in your media plan, the ANA offers some advice (an extended list is available within the report):

  • Work closely with your agency to mitigate, and hopefully, eliminate ad fraud. Chances are your media agency is not scamming you. If you’re getting fooled, so is your media buying agency – work together to create a plan.
  • Insist on learning more about the third-party companies running your programmatic buy. Find out how they reduce fraud on their end, how is traffic verified, search for any associated reviews and fraud reports online.
  • Authorize and approve third-party traffic validation technology.To effectively combat bots in their media buys, advertisers must be able to deploy monitoring tools – if your agency or media partners don’t allow that, consider looking elsewhere.
  • Apply day-parting when you can. Bot fraud represents a higher proportion of traffic between midnight and 7 am – reduce bots by concentrating your spend during ‘waking hours’.
  • Consider reducing buys for older browsers. A large number of bots exist that were created claiming to use IE6 or IE7, excluding these browsers from your targeting will help reduce a large portion of bot traffic.

  • 09.29.15

IQ CEO Tony Quin interviewed in Cannes

Recently IQ CEO Tony Quin made a pilgrimage to the Cannes Lions festival, representing both the agency and the Society of Digital Agencies (SoDA) as the Chairman. While at the festival he participated in the Executive Perspectives interview series and shared his thoughts on advertising trends, the benefits of having talented, driven employees and how data drives strategy and creative to produce exceptional work at IQ.

Here are a few notable excerpts from the interview:

KR: How would you define success in your role?

TQ: The most important job that I have as CEO is to have a sense of where we need to be as an agency 24 months from now so that I can be making sure that the agency is moving toward that. That’s the most important. Because if you don’t get that right, you’re not in business.

KR: What do you do to help your team be successful and help keep them in line with your goals for the company?

TQ: My job is to make sure that I have the smartest people on the bus, and not necessarily in the right seats, and listen to them and empower them. What I’ve learned is that if you just collect really smart people who have the right character for the work, then they are going to tell you the right place to go.

KR: In a world so driven by data today, why do you think creative still matters?

TQ: Creative is the business of connecting emotionally to people. Creative is not about data. Creative itself is really not measurable. Data helps to tell you where to point creative. The strategy that comes out of data – because data itself means nothing; it produces insights and strategy – tells you how to pick the places where you want to spend your money and those places are where you’re going to apply your creative. That last mile is informed by data but it’s always takes some magic which is inspiration and an understanding of the psychology of the people. It’s really hard to make that a science.

KR: Do you feel like creative always needs to be measured?

TQ: You can measure the end result of whether something happens or not. There is some testing you can do around creative. It’s the whole Steve Jobs approach to doing new things. You can’t base it on what’s happened in the past so at some point somebody is taking a leap of faith or just having a creative idea and you just have to go with it or not. You don’t really know what’s going to happen.

KR: How do you motivate your team on a day-to-day basis?

TQ: Every company, whether it’s a big company or a small company, has to have a vision of tomorrow. It’s kind of what we’re selling to our brands. Any kind of branding is a promise for tomorrow. That promise is, in some way, “tomorrow is going to be better.” It’s the same thing with a team. The reason you’re doing this work, other than getting a paycheck, is to create some better thing and you have to define that a little bit for people and make them excited.

KR: Can you describe the attributes of one of your top performers?

TQ: What I look for is people who are self-motivated, have an entrepreneurial spirit, are not about doing the mechanics of their job. They are about achieving the goals of their job. It’s not really about how they do it; it’s about how they get there, which is very entrepreneurial. I look for people who are sufficiently confident in themselves and aren’t afraid of taking risks.

KR: How would you describe the difference between an idea and a solution?

TQ: Ideas are bigger than solutions. Solutions, you have a problem and some parameters around a problem and you want to find something that solves that problem.  An idea can be much bigger than that. An idea might solve a problem but it might have many more ramifications to it. Ideas are about what capture the imagination of people. They can drive companies. They can change the marketplace. They can create movements. Whereas a solution is just, “I’m really glad we solved that problem.”

KR: What are you looking to take away from Cannes?

TQ: I wear two hats. I have my agency, IQ, and it’s always interesting to hear what’s going on and I always get ideas. With my primary job being what’s going to happen 18 to 24 months in the future and “are we on the right path for that?”, it’s great to come to these places where people are talking about those things, about what’s next. The other hat I wear is as the founder and chairman of the board of SoDA. SoDA is a wonderful organization where I get a chance to give back to my community and to have great relationships with people who are in the same boat that I’m in, running agencies around the world, so that’s very fulfilling.


Ad Blocker Panic on Madison Ave

Ad Blockers are the talk of the town these days. But it’s not like we haven’t seen them coming. Around the world Ad Blockers have been gaining momentum with consumers snapping them up in droves. From Germany to the Far East, pop-up ads, banner ads, even video ads are disappearing from digital screens faster than you can say hype. And now Apple and other platform owners are announcing integration of ad blocking software to screen out the last vestiges of invasive, evil brand messaging.

While it’s nothing new for consumers to dislike advertising, what is new is the accelerating move away from ad-based models across the media spectrum. In TV viewers can barely tolerate ads anymore compared to the nirvana of subscription-based experiences. And just as TV ad revenue is escaping to the promise of the blossoming digital world, Ad Blockers are ruining the party before it even gets started.

This story, however, is not really about Ad Blockers, or desperate publishers, but about brands; the companies that make it all possible.  Ad Blockers are just the latest nail in the coffin of the old paid media model.  Big ad buys where the agency makes easy money, and the brand is happy with lots of meaningless impressions, are going the way of the Dodo. Not because agencies or brands got smart or responsible, but because consumers are forcing an end to their obsolescent scheme.

In this transparent, no hiding-in-the-corners market, brands have no alternative but to truly serve consumers if they want their business. That means superior products, great service, social responsibility, and a commitment to education versus prestidigitation.

In marketing that means apps and websites that bring function and value, content that educates, and creativity that enhances the meaning of the brand.  It’s harder than making banner ads and spamming the world with pointless impressions, but it works because it’s what consumers want.


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