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Posts Tagged "storytelling"

  • 12.16.15

IQ’s Favorite Apps and Services of 2015

Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens
Bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens
Brown paper packages tied up with strings
These are a few of our favorite……apps.

Unroll.me – Far superior to Gmail’s tabbed approach, Unroll.me is the simplest way to manage and filter your email to greatly reduce the number of times your phone vibrates and distracts you from what is truly important.

IQ best apps - unroll.me

Slack – Email will never die but that’s not stopping Slack from trying. Slack manages office communication with great cross-platform integration and we love the awesome giphy feature.

IQ best apps - Slack

Spotify – The streaming music service’s user base continued to grow this year and they extended into the fitness app market by launching a running feature that detects steps per minute, matching song pace to the user’s actual pace.

IQ best apps - Spotify

Instagram – While VSCO made a strong push this year, Instagram is still the photo sharing app to beat. From a marketing perspective the new self-serve ad platform they unleashed this year is fantastic!

IQ best apps - Instagram

Marriott – In addition to the great design this powerful hotel app (yes, we were surprised a hotel app made the list too) does more than just book your next stay at any of their 4,000 properties. You can chat with an associate to dial in the specifics of your booking or make special requests.

IQ best apps - Marriott

Timehop – Time travel to your past social posts. One of the best apps even though it can cause some self-shaming.

IQ best apps - Timehop

Snapchat – Started as a joke among older millennials but they’ve innovated to be a good news source for a tough market of media consumers, and their creative filters are almost memes themselves!

IQ best apps - Snapchat

Venmo and Cash – Instant and secure ways to send and receive money between individuals. It’s actually frightening how fast they work. Venmo took it one step further and socialized the act of sending money.

IQ best apps - Venmo and Cash

TwoDots – More than a few of us are addicted to this game. Just download it and curse us later.

IQ best apps - Two Dots

Favor – Their tag line is “Get Anything Delivered” Seriously. Anything. Food from your favorite barbeque place? Done.

Need a stapler? Done.

Anything you want in your city in under an hour.

IQ best apps - Favor

Tripit – If you connect your Outlook, Yahoo, or Gmail accounts Tripit will automatically pull plane tickets, hotel confirmation, restaurants reservations, and event tickets into the app and send you reminders of where you are supposed to be when.  One place for all of your itinerary needs. Some of us won’t travel without it.

IQ best apps - Tripit

So what will 2016 bring? We’re betting on apps and services that provide deeper connectivity and tied into wearables as more products enter the market at lower price points. Let us know what technologies IQ can research for your business.

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  • 11.03.15

3 Ways Voice and Tone Influence Brand Perception

“It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it.”

We’ve all heard this adage before. While it may serve a purpose in personal communication, it’s just not true for brands. As a brand what you say is just as important as how you say it. And since most brand communication is written, you’ve got to account for a lack of vocal and facial nuance with what you’re saying, too.

It's all in your voice and tone

Every brand has a style guide, and just as important as having branded logos and colors is having a brand voice and tone document. This document will help you figure out how to express the brand’s values and thinking in written communication on websites, emails, social posts, and more. Voice and tone are two distinct aspects of verbal and written expression that impact how a brand’s audience perceives them.

A brand’s “voice” is much like a person’s “voice.” It’s how they speak, the words they use and the order of phrases that communicate a feeling or message.

A brand’s tone, just like a person’s, changes subtly depending on the topic. A brand may use more slang or be more energetic on social media, but more straightforward on an email or a landing page.

Let’s look at an example of how the voice stays consistent while the tone shifts with circumstance:

How a brand interacts with their audience on social media on 4th of July is going to look a lot different from how they do on Memorial Day. Why? Because 4th of July is a day of patriotic celebration, and Memorial Day is a day of remembrance for those who have died while serving our country. You wouldn’t want to share a post for Memorial Day with the cheerful exuberance you would expect in a 4th of July post. If you did that, you risk alienating the members of your audience who have ties to the military.

Clearly the tone is just as important as the voice in these kind of posts, and both are equally likely to influence the way an audience views a brand. Here are some things to keep in mind when thinking of how to use your brand’s voice and tone to positively influence your audience:

1. Pinpoint what you want to talk about as a brand.

Understanding what topics you want to talk about as a brand is a great first step. These topics should relate back to the brand’s values. You can incorporate the brand values into your writing on these topics. This is a great way to reinforce who your brand is and what the brand stands for.

2. Understand the words that evoke your brand values to your audience.

You know who your brand is, but are you showing your audience who you are as a brand? To find out what your audience thinks of you, you can use social listening to analyze what words or phrases your audience uses to describe you. Using emotionally evocative language is a simple way to impact how your audience sees you. If your audience sees you as glib when you’re going for lighthearted, take a moment to look at the language you’re using as a brand and find ways to keep it playful but sincere.

3. Treat your audience like a part of your team.

You want your audience to become fans and advocates of your brand. You don’t want your audience to feel like they’re being condescended. Share tips, but don’t write in a way that makes your brand sound superior. This can be the simple difference between saying “You may know _____ but did you know _____?” versus “here is every little thing about ______.”  Encourage your audience to create and share their own content with your social media accounts by writing posts that have a personal touch. If your audience feels like you’re creating a community, they are more likely to feel connected to your brand and be involved with your social accounts.

Ultimately as a brand what you say and how you say it impacts how your audience sees you and relates to you. By creating a clear voice and tone guide for your brand you can understand how your audience sees you. As well, you can have a positive influence on their future interactions with your brand on your website, via email and social networks.

Want to know more about IQ? Contact Us

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  • 11.02.15

Tis the season of #PSL

PerceiveShareLearn

Tis the season of #PSL.

For most people that means the season of orange packaging and pumpkin spice flavors infiltrating everything from coffee creamer to dog treats. But at IQ we take a different approach to that three letter acronym:

Perceive. Share. Learn.

These three principles are at the core of how we grow our knowledge and understanding of any topic, both personally and professionally. When an IQ-er finds an insightful or interesting article online we share it with colleagues via Slack post or an email, and odds are you do the same. This is a simple and effective way to encourage collaborative learning and growth between coworkers.

So put down your pumpkin spice latte and see what the real #PSL is all about.

Perceive.

Perception is at the center of almost everything we do in advertising and marketing Even before we begin a project, we think about different content that we find interesting and pinpoint why. Then, we consider how different audiences react to content as well as how our clients do. We conduct research to find out more about our clients’ audiences as well as those of their competitors. Even during the creative process, we go through rounds of feedback to see what different roles at our agency think about the work. This is all perception, and it’s one of the most important things we do.

Share.

It takes three clicks or less to go from reading an article to sharing it with your network on Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook. We all share an enormous amount of content with people every day via social and messaging apps.

When you share something of interest, like updates to a popular social media platform, you’re not only giving others the opportunity to view it, you’re also opening a platform for discussion. This often leads to a wider perspective and understanding of the topic at hand. In the workplace, this also shows your colleagues what topics you are passionate about, and can position you as the go-to expert on content strategy, social listening or another subject.

Learn.

You learn something new every day. It’s not always a radical epiphany, but striving to gain more knowledge and understanding of the topics you work with on a daily basis is important. Not only will you be better informed and ahead of the curve on trends, you will also be considered a thought leader in your office – if not on a larger scale. Learning is best when it’s collaborative, so take time to create a dialogue with coworkers on relevant professional topics that makes everyone more knowledgeable.

These three principles feed into each other and create a cycle that propels you forward in professional development, both personally and as a team. At IQ, we #PSL every day. How do you?

Want to know more about IQ? Contact Us

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IQ Spotlight: T.R. Wilhoit, Brand Strategist

  • 10.23.15

IQ Spotlight: T.R. Wilhoit, Brand Strategist

IQ Spotlight TR Wilhoit, Brand Strategist

IQ is made up of a bunch of rockstars that make incredible work for our clients everyday. We want to give you a glimpse of what it’s like to work in IQ, so once a month we’re going to interview an IQ-er and let you get to know them better.

For the official record, what is your name and your title at IQ?

My name is T.R. Wilhoit and I’m a Brand Strategist at IQ.

What are a few sites you visit at least once a week?

I check Pulse, which is a news aggregator, CNN, and Twitter pretty regularly. They’re useful and pragmatic.

What does “Creative Intelligence” mean to you?

I think it’s the center point where creative executions meet with strategy. I think it’s more conceptual than strategy that informs creative, but the magic meeting between the two.

Tell me about the moment you knew this was the direction you wanted to pursue professionally.

I didn’t really have that moment. It’s been more like a journey of the next logical step. I didn’t study advertising in school, but I interned at IQ and I liked it. I was kind of the black sheep of my major, Sport Marketing. Most people wanted to work in professional sports, I was more “ I like marketing and social media.” And they were like “what’s social media?” So I did more digital work in internships, which lead me here.

What gets you “in the zone” for work?

It depends on what kind of work I’m doing. If it’s more collaborative conceptual thinking or strategy messaging, then laughing helps. If you’re having a good time with the people you’re brainstorming with then that helps get ideas going. If I’m doing something more on my own I like to put on my headphones and put on whatever playlist I have handy.

Quickfire:

Beach or Pool?

Beach.

Stripes or Polka Dots?

Stripes.

Checkers or Chess?

Checkers.

Cats or Dogs?

Cats.

Tea or Coffee?

Coffee.

Now you know a little more about T.R. Wilhoit!

Want to know more about IQ? Contact Us

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  • 09.29.15

IQ CEO Tony Quin interviewed in Cannes

Recently IQ CEO Tony Quin made a pilgrimage to the Cannes Lions festival, representing both the agency and the Society of Digital Agencies (SoDA) as the Chairman. While at the festival he participated in the Executive Perspectives interview series and shared his thoughts on advertising trends, the benefits of having talented, driven employees and how data drives strategy and creative to produce exceptional work at IQ.

Here are a few notable excerpts from the interview:

KR: How would you define success in your role?

TQ: The most important job that I have as CEO is to have a sense of where we need to be as an agency 24 months from now so that I can be making sure that the agency is moving toward that. That’s the most important. Because if you don’t get that right, you’re not in business.

KR: What do you do to help your team be successful and help keep them in line with your goals for the company?

TQ: My job is to make sure that I have the smartest people on the bus, and not necessarily in the right seats, and listen to them and empower them. What I’ve learned is that if you just collect really smart people who have the right character for the work, then they are going to tell you the right place to go.

KR: In a world so driven by data today, why do you think creative still matters?

TQ: Creative is the business of connecting emotionally to people. Creative is not about data. Creative itself is really not measurable. Data helps to tell you where to point creative. The strategy that comes out of data – because data itself means nothing; it produces insights and strategy – tells you how to pick the places where you want to spend your money and those places are where you’re going to apply your creative. That last mile is informed by data but it’s always takes some magic which is inspiration and an understanding of the psychology of the people. It’s really hard to make that a science.

KR: Do you feel like creative always needs to be measured?

TQ: You can measure the end result of whether something happens or not. There is some testing you can do around creative. It’s the whole Steve Jobs approach to doing new things. You can’t base it on what’s happened in the past so at some point somebody is taking a leap of faith or just having a creative idea and you just have to go with it or not. You don’t really know what’s going to happen.

KR: How do you motivate your team on a day-to-day basis?

TQ: Every company, whether it’s a big company or a small company, has to have a vision of tomorrow. It’s kind of what we’re selling to our brands. Any kind of branding is a promise for tomorrow. That promise is, in some way, “tomorrow is going to be better.” It’s the same thing with a team. The reason you’re doing this work, other than getting a paycheck, is to create some better thing and you have to define that a little bit for people and make them excited.

KR: Can you describe the attributes of one of your top performers?

TQ: What I look for is people who are self-motivated, have an entrepreneurial spirit, are not about doing the mechanics of their job. They are about achieving the goals of their job. It’s not really about how they do it; it’s about how they get there, which is very entrepreneurial. I look for people who are sufficiently confident in themselves and aren’t afraid of taking risks.

KR: How would you describe the difference between an idea and a solution?

TQ: Ideas are bigger than solutions. Solutions, you have a problem and some parameters around a problem and you want to find something that solves that problem.  An idea can be much bigger than that. An idea might solve a problem but it might have many more ramifications to it. Ideas are about what capture the imagination of people. They can drive companies. They can change the marketplace. They can create movements. Whereas a solution is just, “I’m really glad we solved that problem.”

KR: What are you looking to take away from Cannes?

TQ: I wear two hats. I have my agency, IQ, and it’s always interesting to hear what’s going on and I always get ideas. With my primary job being what’s going to happen 18 to 24 months in the future and “are we on the right path for that?”, it’s great to come to these places where people are talking about those things, about what’s next. The other hat I wear is as the founder and chairman of the board of SoDA. SoDA is a wonderful organization where I get a chance to give back to my community and to have great relationships with people who are in the same boat that I’m in, running agencies around the world, so that’s very fulfilling.

  • 07.23.15

Three Weeks with a Computer on my Wrist

Russ's Apple Watch Review

UPDATED: 11/3/15  Tweetbot has released a native Apple Watch App. More information can be found here.

How many times a day do our smart phones interrupt our conversations and moments with colleagues, clients, family and friends?  Each time the device vibrates on our desk, conference room table, kitchen table or in our pocket, it triggers a series of actions. We retrieve the smart phone, unlock the smart phone, open the app that caused the vibration, read the notification, act on the notification and finally put the phone back down.  Then we reengage with the people around us.

The Apple Watch eliminates many of the extraneous actions and distractions, allowing us to be more present with the people we’re with. It’s hardware that helps filter important versus unimportant.

Unlike smart phones with vibration motors so loud they serve as ringtones, no one knows when an alert is received on Apple Watch.  The Taptic Engine is quiet and alerts only the user; no one else is the wiser. When it’s convenient, you take a quick look and if the message warrants attention you can engage from the watch, or if necessary move to the iPhone to complete the activity.

If your phone constantly vibrates or if your friends, family or colleagues mention how often you’re on your device, the Apple Watch is for you. This device has changed how I interact with people. It has made me more present and less distracted and based on that alone, this device is fantastic.

And now for a more traditional review of the 42mm Sport, Space Gray with the black Sport band.

Look & Feel –

When picking up an Apple Watch the weight was noticeable. It is not heavy but it has an unexpected mass; it doesn’t feel cheap. You know you’re wearing it but the weight is unobtrusive. The Sport band is soft with a slight firmness.  After three weeks of use, 12 sweaty workouts, and 3 very sweaty lawn mowing sessions the band shows no signs of deterioration or discoloration.

One of the features Apple paraded was their reinvention of the watch crown as the Digital Crown; “A modern twist on a traditional feature.” It functions smoothly and with just a hint of resistance. But until Watch OS2 comes out, the Digital Crown just doesn’t have a whole lot of functionality that you can’t also do by swiping up and down on the screen.

After watching this it sure seems as though Apple sandbagged about the water resistance. There are brave users like Tim Cook who shower with their Watch on but so far my wariness of ruining it has limited my water exposure to washing my hands.

The battery life has also been a pleasant surprise. My day starts at 8 a.m., I try to workout three to four times a week, have a yard to maintain and am a night owl. Even with this elevated usage I have yet to see the battery dip below 30 percent.  And since my iPhone isn’t waking up and vibrating with all of the notifications it’s sending to the Watch I’ve noticed improved battery life there as well.

I tested the watch’s heart rate monitor against the built-in heart rate monitor on two different stationary bikes and an elliptical.  The rate came within one or two heartbeats per minute, finally allowing me to believe those machines have been telling the truth all these years.

Taking calls on your watch sounded completely silly at first. In our open office it would be rude to make a call but in the car and at home it’s a great and easy way to communicate without actively holding a device. For example, I can keep cooking dinner or fold laundry while talking to my mom. (Hi, Mom!)

Apple Watch notifications for messages, emails, twitter and calendar reminders make the Watch so useful. As was addressed in the opening, the simple glance and dismiss functionality allows you to be more present with people and in the moment. It would be a nice future feature to select different rhythms and intensities to differentiate between notifications or contacts.

Replying to mail won’t be here until Watch OS2 but using Siri to send to messages or start a phone call is fast and simple, and might be my favorite way to communicate right now. The default replies can be edited for your style.

Twitter notifications like mentions, favorites, and retweets are sent to Apple Watch and Twitter’s app allows tweeting from the Watch but with some limitations. Personally, I’m holding out for the best Twitter app, Tweetbot, to make a Watch app. (Tick tock, Tweetbot!)

The built-in exercises the Watch will track are limited to Outdoor Run, Outdoor Walk, Outdoor Cycle, Indoor Run, Indoor Walk, Indoor Cycle, Elliptical, Rower, Stair Stepper and Other. Most of my workouts are in the “Other” category, which is fine but as processors and accelerometers improve I’m hopeful Watch will be able to track exercises like pull ups, sit ups, weight lifting, and other fitness activities.

Overall there are many positive features, but there are a few cons as well. At times Siri isn’t the easiest digital personal to wake up via voice and occasionally the home screen is unresponsive. This is probably to prevent Watch from being accidently woken up and to preserve battery life. Perhaps the sensitivity will get dialed in over time. The Digital Crown and Force Touch functionality are largely wasted because third party apps don’t have access to them but that will change with Watch OS2.

This product is useful right out of the box but the future of the device is most exciting. Coming in Watch OS2, more customizable watch faces to enhance the home screen with information that is important to you. Time Travel on the home screen; not only to see what’s coming up next but what your predicted battery life will be at that future moment. The SDK and native apps from third party developers will eliminate the current lag time.

All in all, the Apple Watch is a delightful way to navigate your life and work while leaving your phone in your pocket.

Contact us and let IQ research new and emerging technologies for your business.

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  • 05.15.15

IQ Spotlight: Shaun Hines, Art Director

IQ Spotlight - Shaun Hines

IQ is made up of a bunch of rockstars that make incredible work for our clients everyday. We want to give you a glimpse of what it’s like to work in IQ, so every other Friday we’re going to interview an IQ-er and let you get to know them better.

For the official record, what is your name and your title at IQ?

My name is Shaun Hines and I’m an Art Director at IQ.

What was your first impression of IQ?

My first impression was that it was a smaller agency that felt very comfortable with approachable, down to earth people.

Tell me about a project or accomplishment that you consider to be the most significant so far in your career?

Working on the Coca-Cola Freestyle website during my first job in the digital agency world. The project, along with the designers I worked with, really changed my design sensibilities and also allowed me to gain some amazing friends/colleagues in the process.

Tell me about the moment you knew this was the direction you wanted to pursue professionally.

This is actually a two-fold answer. I knew this was an area I loved when I was thirteen and I created my own fan page for my favorite shows long before blogging became popular. I taught myself Paint Shop Pro (before Photoshop) and HTML — and I just loved it. I wasn’t until my second year of college that I realized that this could be an actual career field for me and not just a hobby. So, I knew then that that was what I wanted to do.

What does “Creative Intelligence” mean to you?

To me, “Creative Intelligence” means having the skill and the taste for creativity, yet having the intelligence to decipher what the client wants and delivering work that everyone is satisfied with.

What is something you’ve learned in the last week?

I recently learned the truth about weather report percentages. When they say there’s a 40% chance of rain that means that 40% of the city will see the rain, not that there’s only a chance it might actually rain. MIND. BLOWN.

Quickfire:

Ice cream or frozen yogurt?

Ice cream.

Queso or guacamole?

Queso.

Instagram or Snapchat?

Instagram.

Manga or comic books?

Manga. No debating.

Paper & ink or tablet & computer?

Tablet & computer.

Now you know a little more about Shaun Hines!

Want to know more about IQ? Contact Us

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The Next Big Fight Won’t Involve Boxers

  • 05.13.15

Coming Home

Noah Echols Rejoins IQ as Director of Strategy

Noah Echols Return to IQ

It’s different for everybody, but I’ve learned over the past couple years what it is that makes me happy at work.

I worked for a large agency several years ago and I got to work with some really big, exciting clients on projects that make careers. Prior to that I worked for a journalism start up that focused on the niche topic of juvenile justice. I went home each day feeling as if I was doing something beneficial for society – helping to shed light on a topic that is under covered by mainstream media outlets. And just recently I led digital marketing for a large, very stable, well-respected company. I had the privilege of having the trust of leadership to do a lot of big projects in a relatively short amount of time that separated the company from its competition in terms of its digital marketing sophistication.

While all great jobs, none of them fulfilled me professionally.

For me, it’s the people and the environment we create together that matter. I don’t mean that I just need to like the people I work with – at each of the places I’ve worked, the people have been fantastic. It’s the culture that we cultivate that matters – one where you work hard together and at the end of the day feel like you accomplished something great AND grew personally in the process.

The reason I came back to IQ is because I craved the indirect opportunities to learn and grow by just being surrounded by so many brilliant people approaching a similar problem from different perspectives. IQ is especially unique because egos are non-existent, the people are fun and friendly, and the culture is one of support and collaboration unlike anywhere I’ve ever seen. It truly is a hub of innovative thinking for our clients because we all love what we do and thoroughly enjoy doing it everyday with each other.

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The Next Big Fight Won’t Involve Boxers

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  • 05.08.15

The Five Roles in a Project Team

5 Roles in a Project Team

An agency is the perfect environment for big personalities to come together and create unique, insightful, performance-driven products. Most of the world sees the final, refined results, but behind the curtain is hours upon hours of teamwork. While this collaboration between roles can certainly be harmonious, it usually comes with a little friction too.

As the team works together, the project manager guides the workflow and conversation while encouraging collaboration, turning critiques into improvements and encouraging open-mindedness. The project manager works as a mediator, recognizing when people aren’t connecting and then building bridges between their ideas. So how do project managers create compromises and harmony? First, they get to know the various personalities of the team members.

The course Introduction to Project Management from Looking Glass Development defines the roles that people naturally fall into. It’s important that a project manager recognizes how these roles come together to make a well-rounded project team.

Creator

  • Creators are natural-born leaders. They’re the brainstormers and idea people who can’t be confined to boundaries.
  • They’re always thinking about what’s new, which means they can also lose focus as the project develops.

Advancer

  • Less than 5% of people, the advancers are like coaches giving an inspiring locker room speech. They’re the motivators, charmers and sellers. The advancers can sell anyone on a new, cutting-edge idea that would seem too risky were it not for their confidence, while giving the team the drive it needs to perform well.

Refiner

  • The refiners are the detail people, the logical ones, or as a creator (the antithesis of a refiner) might say, “the dream killers.” Refiners think through what actually needs to happen to implement an idea, and they tend to balance the creator by calling out what is and isn’t feasible.
  • The grounded approach the refiner takes is essential in order to successfully create a product.

Executor

  • Executors are often the most under recognized of all roles. They’re not leaders, nor are they creative or innovative. But they get things done. No matter how challenging, they’ll finish on time, and the product will be exactly what was communicated to them.
  • They execute so well that they prefer to tackle everything completely on their own, which means they can sometimes have trouble delegating work.

Project Manager

  • Project managers take on each role, knowing when one is lacking and taking it upon themselves to restore balance. They face the most harrowing challenge by encompassing the other roles while also working to empower other team members.

It is very important to have at least one person in all of these roles on a team. Here’s why:

When concepting a new project, there always seems to be at least one person (typically a creator) with a grand, large-scale idea that they claim will solve every problem in the world. While it might be an interesting concept, it’s then time for the refiner to chime in to check the concept: is this feasible? Or maybe the executor: is this something I can actually do? Even the advancer should ask: can we get people excited about this? Once all of these questions are addressed and accounted for, that’s when a project really comes together.

As the project progresses, the executor implements the team’s idea. Though once the creator’s interest wanes, they’ll need some encouragement from the advancer to power through. The refiner thinks ahead, anticipating the team’s best plan of attack for any changes, and the project manager keeps a watchful eye on the team to maintain a healthy balance.

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The Next Big Fight Won’t Involve Boxers

  • 05.05.15

The Next Big Fight Won’t Involve Boxers

Content Providers Fighting

Many people are saying the “fight of the century” between Mayweather and Pacquiao didn’t live up to the hype. But a new fight emerged in the aftermath, live video streaming apps Periscope and Meerkat versus content providers. And this fight should be highly entertaining.

It is estimated that hundreds of thousands of people watched this past weekend’s boxing match for free using these services. Sure the video quality was not HD and the audio was from whatever party was streaming it but the alternate broadcast was good enough for a lot of people. A lot of people who didn’t pay $100 a piece.

Let’s say that just three hundred thousand people worldwide watched via Periscope/Meercat. If those people had instead paid to see the fight that would have generated thirty million in revenue.  That’s ten percent of the overall fight’s purse. In a day when HBO and Showtime are still sending bounty hunters to bars to find illegal fight broadcasts, they aren’t going to leave thirty million just lying around. Even if the fight brought in revenues of at least four-hundred million.

But what happens when Periscope opens up an API? This situation is going to explode. Imagine a high quality GoPro camera live streaming a Taylor Swift concert via Periscope from the front row. Access and then monetization. A scalper gets their hands on a premium ticket and now it’s not about reselling it to the highest bidder, it’s about making money from live streaming from that ultra-exclusive location.

Twitter has a lot of friends in entertainment; friends that spend a lot of money within Twitter. And Hollywood uses/needs Twitter to make a lot of money for their TV shows, records, movies, and events. It’s going to be fun to watch both sides maneuver but the winners will be the artists and entertainers who figure out how to adapt and use the new technology to their advantage and elevate the user experience.

If you have questions about how to enhance your content using emerging technologies contact IQ.

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